Welcome to my weblog. My name is Dillan and I am pleased to make your virtual acquaintance. I take joy in the small things in life and I hope that you do too. I am currently a student, and I aspire to do great things in the years to come. So follow along with me as I experience this journey into the unknown.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/

The Last Mission

Early in the morn’ they raise me to my lofty position.
Today I’m on land, other days sailing the sea, joyfully frolicking in the caress of that Pacific breeze.
There is a gloom in the air,
skies overcast,
and it’s palpable pressure is surely steadfast.
I notice a solemn look on the faces that pass, and also that my comrades have raised me only to half mast.
As my tears, and those, of the cumulus meet,
The captain and his men lower me to my feet.
With the assistance of my dear friends, we march uniformly around the bend, to the place where our brother’s journey ends.
The captain strides over and whispers to me,
“Soldier I bequeath upon you one final duty.”
Without hesitation I will do it with honor,
Carrying the legacy of my forefathers.
I embrace my fallen comrade, in our eternal position,
As his guide, his protector, this is my last mission.

Tarsals

The foundation for all beings that move,
Rhythm and tempo you step to the groove,
Taken for granted up until we lose,
The ability to sustain movement smooth.
Noticeably superior under the effects of booze,
Why tarsals, do we cover you in shoes?

Reblogged from krizzzzlandia  133,356 notes
sherokutakari:

curiousercreature:

letsallnukethewhales:

madlori:

nevver:

The alphabet fades away

Would you like to read a book in which this happens?
It’s one of my all-time favorite books.  It’s called Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn.  He describes it as an “progressively lipogrammatic epistolary fable.”
It is written in the form of letters between the citizens of the fictional island of Nollop, an independent nation off the coast of South Carolina and home of Nevin Nollop, who invented the phrase “the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.”  That phrase is written in tiles over a statue of Nollop in their town square, and when one night a storm causes one of the tiles to fall, the council decides that it’s a sign from Nollop that they are no longer allowed to use that letter, in speech or writing, on pain of progressive punishments including public beating and up to banishment.
Then another tile falls.  Then another.
The citizens, who are all very attached to their words and writing, mount a campaign to come up with a phrase that uses all 26 letters but is shorter than Nollop’s, thus proving that he was not divine and negating all the edicts.
Because the novel is told in the form of letters the citizens write, and this is the genius part…the author must also stop using the letters as they fall.  So the book gradually stops using letters until at one point I think they’re down to just five.
The resolution literally made me get up and dance around the room.
It’s clever, creative, and a not-really-veiled-at-all parable about monotheistic oligarchy.  It’s not a long book, you can read it in an afternoon.
GO READ IT RIGHT NOW.

WOW I want to read that book

Very rarely is there a book that I must read at any costThis is now one of them

I WAS JUST TALKING ABOUT THIS BOOK THE OTHER DAY AND COULDN’T REMEMBER FOR THE LIFE OF ME WHAT IT WAS CALLEDTHANK YOU TUMBLR USER MADLORI

sherokutakari:

curiousercreature:

letsallnukethewhales:

madlori:

nevver:

The alphabet fades away

Would you like to read a book in which this happens?

It’s one of my all-time favorite books.  It’s called Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn.  He describes it as an “progressively lipogrammatic epistolary fable.”

It is written in the form of letters between the citizens of the fictional island of Nollop, an independent nation off the coast of South Carolina and home of Nevin Nollop, who invented the phrase “the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.”  That phrase is written in tiles over a statue of Nollop in their town square, and when one night a storm causes one of the tiles to fall, the council decides that it’s a sign from Nollop that they are no longer allowed to use that letter, in speech or writing, on pain of progressive punishments including public beating and up to banishment.

Then another tile falls.  Then another.

The citizens, who are all very attached to their words and writing, mount a campaign to come up with a phrase that uses all 26 letters but is shorter than Nollop’s, thus proving that he was not divine and negating all the edicts.

Because the novel is told in the form of letters the citizens write, and this is the genius part…the author must also stop using the letters as they fall.  So the book gradually stops using letters until at one point I think they’re down to just five.

The resolution literally made me get up and dance around the room.

It’s clever, creative, and a not-really-veiled-at-all parable about monotheistic oligarchy.  It’s not a long book, you can read it in an afternoon.

GO READ IT RIGHT NOW.

WOW I want to read that book

Very rarely is there a book that I must read at any cost
This is now one of them

I WAS JUST TALKING ABOUT THIS BOOK THE OTHER DAY AND COULDN’T REMEMBER FOR THE LIFE OF ME WHAT IT WAS CALLED

THANK YOU TUMBLR USER MADLORI